KDL Blog ‘Books & More’ Category

Two Titles to Get Your Blood Boiling

Monday, April 21st, 2014

Looking to add a little rage into your life? Take your blood pressure medication and check out these new titles.

The Divide                  Flash Boys

Veteran Rolling Stone reporter Matt Taibbi is your tour guide into The Divide – the bizarro-America where a joint in a man’s pocket lands him in Rikers but money laundering $850 million for a drug cartel earns not a single day in prison. Taibbi traces the history of Too Big to Jail and criminalization of poverty. Taibbi’s biting wit and fierce insight is at full strength in his latest work.

“Stock market’s rigged,” declared Michael Lewis in his 60 Minutes interview. In Flash Boys Lewis shines a light on the dark world of high frequency trading (HFT) — buying and selling stock at rates 100 times faster than the blink of an eye. The story focuses on Brad Katsuyama, an investor at a Canadian Bank who wonders why it seems like the market reads his mind. Why does the price spike immediately before he buys shares? The answer is that HFTs are front-running: beating investors to the punch and selling them inflated stock. Master storyteller Lewis makes financial reporting a thrilling page-turner.

 


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Book Bash Is This Weekend!

Monday, April 21st, 2014

BookBash-KDL_jpgBook Bash is right around the corner! We hope you plan to attend our Giant Warehouse Book Sale, featuring more than 20,000 gently-used books and other items that will be available for just 50 cents to $1 each. Sunday is Bag Day — $5 buys as many items as you can fit in a bag. All proceeds support Summer Reading @ KDL and other branch programs. Held at the KDL Service Center, 814 West River Center Dr. NE in Comstock Park.

Friday, April 25, 5:00 – 8:00 PM (Special time for teachers only from 3:00 – 5:00 PM)
Saturday, April 26, 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Sunday, April 27, 1:00 – 4:00 PM

 


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KDL Top Ten — Adult Inspirational Fiction

Friday, April 18th, 2014

Stir the soul and brighten your day with this week’s Top Ten!  These are ten of the most popular Adult Inspirational Fiction titles at KDL this month:

Top Ten Adult Inspirational 04-18-2014

Tell us: What’s your favorite Inspirational title?

 


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Author Gabriel García Márquez Dies At Age 87

Friday, April 18th, 2014

Gabriel García Márquez, well-known Colombian author of “One Hundred Years of Solitude” and “Love in the Time of Cholera,” died Thursday at the age of 87 at his home in Mexico City.  His works of fiction were deeply rooted in a Latin American landscape but found universal appeal, with his works being translated into dozens of languages.

García Márquez also received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982. “Each new work of his is received by expectant critics and readers as an event of world importance,” the Swedish Academy of Letters said in awarding him the Nobel.

 

 


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Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

andrewcarnegiemedalThe Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence recently announced the awards shortlist:

In Fiction:

In Nonfiction:

The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction were established in 2012 to recognize the best fiction and nonfiction books for adult readers published in the U.S. the previous year. The winners (one for fiction, one for nonfiction) are announced at an event at the American Library Association’s Annual Conference.

 


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“The Great Beauty”

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

The Great BeautyThe Great Beauty,” which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film for 2013, has been compared favorably to a classic Italian film, Fellini’s “8 ½,” made decades before, and the comparison shows how well-received this film has been and how Italian film continues to dazzle and intrigue viewers from around the world. Directed and co-written by Paolo Sorrentino, The Great Beauty, like Fellini’s earlier masterpiece, centers on a man (“Jep” played by Toni Servillo) who is trying to find his way in a world that has been good to him (he’s a writer) but that doesn’t seem to be very good itself.  Blessed with an apartment in Rome overlooking the Coliseum, he throws lavish parties, sleeps in late, and seemingly has the world as his oyster. To try and describe the plot of this film would be pointless though, since rather than engaging in a traditional narrative arc, Sorrentino gives us an episodic structure  showing numerous facets of the world Jep is living in—a world of beautiful women who offer themselves to him, (but that he walks away from), of mentally ill children of friends  lost in their own literary worlds, of avant-garde artists and writers and magicians, of a man grieving over his dead wife (and the diary she wrote), of a cardinal alleged to be a great exorcist but who wants to talk about cooking, and, finally, in the closing scenes of the film, a nun (or “future saint” as some call her) who barely talks yet embodies more discipline and insight than almost anyone else in the story.

At 142 minutes, the film takes its time with all these characters and episodes, but the story is helped immensely by the beauty of its cinematography and the feeling that Sorrentino will eventually take us beyond the conventional wisdom that the rich and socially elite of Rome (as elsewhere) are vapid party-goers interested only in the tiny world of their set.  That set of people has access to much of the “great beauty,” but whether they appreciate it in its deepest forms or not is another matter, and by the end of the film we can at least say we know some of that beauty exists, some of it in the present, but some of it in the past, living on in memories as simple and humble as that of a first kiss.

(This film is not rated, but does contain some nudity)

 


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New Fantasy Series at KDL

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Emperor's BladesNeed a new fantasy series to get you hooked?  Have you waited long enough for the new George R.R. Martin novel?  Try these new series of fantasy and adventure!

The Emperor’s Blades by Brian Staveley is the first book in the Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne series.  When the emperor of Annur is assassinated by an unknown enemy, his daughter and two sons work to reveal the assassin and survive the new world.

Star Wars author Drew Karpyshyn’s new novel is Children of Fire.  This epic fantasy focuses on three magical talismans that were lost and a protective magical barrier that is fading with time.

Stormdancer

Speaking of George R.R. Martin, fans of the Song of Ice and Fire series will enjoy Scottish author Anthony Ryan’s debut novel, Blood Song.  The first in the Raven’s Song trilogy, Blood Song is about Vaeliln Al Sorna who has trained his whole life to be a warrior in the Brothers of the Sixth Order.

Australian fantasy author Jay Kristoff’s The Lotus War series is not as new as the others on this list, but is just as imaginative.  Check out Stormdancer and Kinslayer for novels of Japanese-influenced steampunk fantasy.

 

 

 

 


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Read Off Your Fines April 13-26

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

Read off your finesThat cookbook you were returning to the library that got wedged behind the backseat of your car and forgotten over the winter. The novel you only allowed yourself five pages a day to read because you never wanted it to end. The country-western CD your daughter put in her backpack last spring and found this spring.

Has your love of books and other KDL materials made it difficult to let go of some of your checked-out items by their due date? Put that love to work for you Sunday, April 13 through Saturday, April 26. Cardholders with KDL fines (not just KDL cardholders) are invited to visit a branch, and for every 10 minutes spent reading or listening in the library, $1 in overdue fines will be waived up to a maximum of $10 (does not apply to lost or damaged items or collection fees). You can even read off fines for other people!

** Patrons must do their reading at a KDL branch to receive waived overdue fines. See your local branch for more information.

Happy reading!

 


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May LibraryReads Staff Picks

Saturday, April 12th, 2014


You already know that your local KDL staff provide great recommendations when you’re looking for your next favorite book. Now library staff across the nation have connected to offer LibraryReads, a nationwide “Top 10″ list of favorite titles each month! Check out these upcoming titles that librarians across the country have read, loved, and want to share with you.

  1. We Were LiarsLibraryReadsFavoriteWe Were Liars by E. Lockhart
    “This brilliant and heartbreaking novel tells the story of a prestigious family living on a private island off the coast of Massachusetts. Full of love, lies, secrets, no shortage of family dysfunction, and a shocking twist that you won’t see coming. Though this book is written for teens, it shouldn’t be overlooked by anyone looking for a fantastic read.”
    Susan Balla, Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, CT
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  3. All the Light We Cannot SeeAll the Light We Cannot See: A Novel by Anthony Doerr
    “Set during World War II Europe, this novel is sobering without being sentimental. The tension builds as the alternating, parallel stories of Werner and Marie-Laure unfold, and their paths cross. I highly recommend this beautiful and compelling story.”
    Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library, Delphi, IN
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  5. The Bees: A NovelThe Bees by Laline Paull
    “This book is set entirely in a beehive, but the novel and its characters are so beautifully rendered that it could have been set anywhere. Societal codes and social mores combine with the ancient behavior rituals of bees, bringing forth a remarkable story that is sure to be a book club favorite.”
    Ilene Lefkowitz, Denville Public Library, Denville, NJ
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  7. Delicious!: A Novel Delicious!by Ruth Reichl
    “Billie leaves college to take a job with a soon-to-be disbanded food magazine. What follows is an intriguing story involving dusty archives, long-forgotten letters written during World War II to the illustrious James Beard, and a young woman in New York City who learns to trust her culinary talents. This novel is a delectable feast.”
    Paulette Brooks, Elm Grove Public Library, Elm Grove, WI
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  9. The Forgotten SeamstressThe Forgotten Seamstress by Liz Trenow
    “Two women’s stories, separated by close to 100 years, connect through a patchwork quilt. Carolyn finds a quilt in her mother’s attic and is intrigued by its origin, and quiltmaker Maria’s story is told through transcripts. Trenow carefully stitches together a novel about family secrets, using many interesting details about fabrics, needlework, and textile conservation. A strong sense of place and well-told story make this book superior women’s fiction.”
    Leslie DeLooze, Richmond Memorial Library, Batavia, NY
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  11. Bird BoxBird Box: A Novel by Josh Malerman
    “Close your eyes! Don’t look! Something is out there that will drive you mad if you see it. Is it an alien invasion? An environmental toxin? Two sisters, Malorie and Shannon, embark on a journey seeking safety and other survivors. I was unable to put this book down. Horror at its best, not graphic, but truly creepy and scary. Highly recommended for fans of psychological suspense.”
    Mary Vernau, Tyler Public Library, Tyler, TX
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  13. BittersweetBittersweet: A Novel by Miranda Beverly-Whittemore
    “As unlikely a pair of roommates as you’re ever likely to meet: plain, working class Mabel Dagmar and beautiful, privileged Genevra Winslow. Mabel spends the summer in the Winslows’ idyllic lakefront property in Vermont, dreaming of being one of them—only to discover that being a Winslow is not all sunshine, yachts, and ease. Being a Winslow means keeping very disturbing family secrets.”
    Nancy Russell, Columbus Metropolitan Library, Columbus, OH
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  15. Delancey: A Man, a Woman, a Restaurantant, a MarriageDelancey by Molly Wizenberg
    “As Wizenberg tells the story of how she and her husband opened the successful pizza restaurant Delancey, I felt like I was hanging out with a close friend. She also shares delicious sounding recipes for the everyday food they made at home during the hectic days of launching the restaurant. Wizenberg’s writing is so sincere and relatable.”
    Michelle Marx, Eagle Valley Library District, Avon, CO
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  17. Sixth Grave on the Edge by Darynda Jones
    Sixth Grave on the Edge“The continuing adventures of P.I. Charley Davidson and Grim Reaper (not as mutually exclusive as one would think) are just as delightful as in previous books, with new characters including a wonderfully snarky new demon. Jones expands on Charley’s existing relationships and supernatural powers. It’s the perfect paranormal-romance-mystery blend that you never knew you always wanted.”
    Donna Matturri, Pickerington Public Library, Pickerington, OH
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  19. The BlessingsThe Blessings by Elise Juska
    “This finely-crafted story is told through a series of Blessing family members’ points of view over a two-decade span of time. A deceptively small book with very big themes, this novel is gentle and wise. It made me look at my own close and extended family with new eyes; now I see the ways in which we are alike, not the ways in which we are different. A transformative reading experience. Highly recommended.”
    Janet Schneider, Great Neck Library, Great Neck, NY

 

See http://libraryreads.org for more information and find your next great read!

 


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How to Find Appropriate Reading for Kids

Friday, April 11th, 2014

STSN_Logo_for_FB_200_bcommon-sense-media-logo

Finding appropriate reading material for a child is not always an easy task for a parent. Mom and Dad certainly strive to identify literature that encourages their children’s interest in reading, yet sometimes it can be difficult to determine if a book is either content- or reading-level appropriate. As much as we’d love to read everything before our kids get their hands on them, in all likelihood that’s not going to happen. Luckily, there are a couple of online resources that parents can refer to for help (in addition to talking with your local KDL librarian).

Story Snoops and Common Sense Media are two websites that are helpful tools for parents to utilize in navigating the vast amounts of books available for children. They provide reviews of a wide range of youth and teen fiction. In addition to the reviews, each website gives recommendations for what age level is appropriate for reading a particular book based on its content. Both also have some of their own unique features. For example, Common Sense Media has a “Great Handpicked Alternatives” generator that provides titles that are similar to a particular book in subject content, but might be directed to a different age- or reading-level. Story Snoops has a section for each book it reviews called “the scoop,” which describes the book’s content in a way that’s essentially a “head’s up” or “spoiler” of what subject matter a reader will encounter over the course of the story.

 


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