October 16: Meet Four Michigan Authors

October 2nd, 2014

Front coverIn our continued efforts to promote home-grown writing talent, we’re introducing seasonal Michigan Authors Nights at four of our branches, where up to five authors with books published in the past 12 months will be able to sign, read and sell their masterpieces.

The inaugural event will be held at our East Grand Rapids Branch (in the City Commission chambers) on Thursday, October 16 from 6:00–8:00 PM. Our first line-up is:

 


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Save Money on Griffins Tickets

October 1st, 2014

griffins_logoHockey season is here! Use your Kent District Library card to get a great deal on Grand Rapids Griffins hockey tickets.

For every Sunday and Wednesday home game (excluding Dec. 31) during the Grand Rapids Griffins’ 2014-15 regular season, present your Kent District Library card at the Van Andel Arena box office on the night of the game or at The Zone anytime during the store’s regular business hours to purchase either an Upper Level ticket for $14 (regularly $16 advance and $19 day of game) or a Lower Level Faceoff ticket for $18 (regularly $20 in advance and $23 day of game). Limit four tickets per card per person, subject to availability.

Check out the Griffins’ schedule and plan a fun night out for a great deal!

Go Griffins!


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Early Lit Bits: Book Review — “Countablock”

September 28th, 2014

Countablock by Christopher Franceschelli

Christopher Franceschelli, author of Alphablock, now explores numbers in this fun new counting book. Bright illustrations and thick board pages that are die cut into the shapes of numbers make this count book stand out. Two pages are devoted to each number: the first gives a number of objects and the second shows what those objects become. One acorn becomes one oak tree and two snowmen become two puddles on a sunny day. After number ten, the book starts counting by tens and eventually reaches one hundred. Have fun introducing young children to the names of numbers or counting by tens with older children as you share this book.

— Anjie Gleisner at KDL’s Walker Branch

 


 

This article originally appeared in our Early Lit Bits eNewsletter. Read the most recent issue online or sign up to receive this monthly update highlighting early literacy tips and resources for parents and caregivers.

 


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KDL Top Ten — Art

September 26th, 2014

View 10 of the most popular Art books this month at KDL – click on the link to the Top Ten list!

KDL Top Ten Art 9-26-2014


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Program Cancellation: Harvesting & Saving Garden Seeds

September 25th, 2014

SeedLibraryLogoThe Harvesting and Saving Garden Seeds program scheduled to take place at the East Grand Rapids Branch tonight at 6:30 PM has been cancelled. We apologize for the inconvenience and invite you to join us next week instead when this program will be offered at the Plainfield Township Branch on Wednesday, October 1 at 6:30 PM.

 

 

 


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Write Michigan Short Story Workshop: It Lives! Revision and Re-Vision!

September 24th, 2014

WriteMichiganShortStoryWorkshopItLivesDo you have a short story that you would like to enter in the 3rd Annual Write Michigan Short Story Contest? Are you feeling stuck and are not sure what you can do to improve your story? You’re in luck!

KDL is bringing author Caitlin Horrocks, New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice honoree to the Plainfield Township Branch on Saturday, September 27 and the East Grand Rapids Branch on Wednesday, November 12 (note date change) to teach a short story workshop for adults that focuses on revision. At the workshop she will outline strategies for successful revision on many levels, from ruthless line editing to wholesale re-envisioning of stalled or stale stories. There will be readings, discussion and exercises to make problematic pieces more promising. Pre-registration is required and spots are limited.

For more information on the 3rd Annual Write Michigan Short Story Contest please visit www.writemichigan.org

 

 


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Maze Runner Readalikes

September 23rd, 2014

The Maze RunnerYou may have heard that “The Maze Runner” by James Dashner is now on the big screen!  Now that they’ve seen the movie, many people are anxiously awaiting the book. What can you read while you’re waiting for your copy? We have some great suggestions for you!  Check out these Dystopian Fiction for Teens titles at your local branch of Kent District Library today!

 

 

 

 

 


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Talking in Fast Cars

September 23rd, 2014

Certainly one of the signs of the modern age is the speed with which we travel. Add to that the speed of our communications, especially with cell phones now, and we can see that all the drama and complications of life are that much more amplified. Two movies—one from 50 years ago, the other brand new—exemplify this tendency in both fascinating and distressing ways.

Il Sorpasso” (1962), an Italian film directed by Dino Risi just recently released on DVD by the Criterion Collection, is a simple story: it’s a hot summer day, and a hyperactive young man, Bruno, in a slightly beat-up sports car, sees Roberto, a law student, in his apartment window. Bruno needs to call his friends, whom he’s missed. He asks Roberto, a somewhat timid and quiet fellow who isn’t quite sure how to handle this whirlwind character, who says yes. Before either of them know it, they are on the open road and leaving Rome—the Italian countryside beckons, and Bruno, who refuses to be stuck behind any vehicle, uses his rather musical (and obnoxious) horn, and his engine, to get his way. Stops pile on stops, with a gas station, German women, priests and nuns, fish soup, relatives and an ex-wife all part of the quickly moving plot. Roberto, who keeps wanting to go home to study, nevertheless can’t help but enjoy himself with this man who never stops going. The film will strike some as tonally shocking—what starts out as light-hearted turns into something else before the end comes, and that change certainly makes “Il Sorpasso” stand out—especially when one compares it to most mainstream American movies.

Locke,” a new film from England by director Steven Knight, is a simply situated, but not simplistic, drama, entirely set in the interior of a car at night. Lest you think that sounds mind-numbing—or at least more appropriate for a radio drama or a play—think again. The movie works, carried by one actor who drives the car, and helped hugely by the voices of those he loves and works with as they call him and he calls them on his very sophisticated dashboard cell phone system. The driver is Ivan, a family man, a construction manager (he builds skyscrapers), driving from somewhere in the north of England to London. He is going to a hospital there to be with a woman not his wife. He is also facing huge pressures from his employer, because the next day there will converge an armada of cement trucks on the site he’s been managing, one of the biggest projects of its kind in Europe, and he won’t be there. And because he is “connected” so completely with everyone in his life, everyone has a (disembodied) voice to scream at him, plead with him, argue with him, and maybe even console him before the end of the movie. On top of all that, there is also the (unseen and unheard) ghost of his father, who was less than stellar in that role for Ivan. As he navigates his vehicle through the night, Ivan controls access to himself, through his car and his phone, but that doesn’t mean he is free from the consequences of his actions. “Locke” takes a perfectly modern situation and runs with it—a wonderfully balanced tale about choices that, despite the trappings of its modern technology, never loses its human touch.


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Free Retirement Planning Program

September 23rd, 2014

Future Proof InvestingIt’s never too early to begin planning for your financial future. We can help! Adults are invited to attend Future Proof Retirement Planning, taking place at three KDL branches this fall. Kelly Gilbert and Steve Kitchen, authors of Future Proof Investing, will teach you to make financial decisions based upon your own goals and objectives. In keeping with KDL policy, this is not a sales seminar, but an informational program about different models of retirement planning and how to save and protect funds for an attainable and sustainable retirement.

Schedule:
Thursday, October 9, 6:30 PM – Byron Township Branch
Thursday, October 23,  6:30 PM – Grandville Branch
Saturday, November 1, 2:00 PM – Gaines Township Branch

We hope to see you there!


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2014 National Book Award for Fiction

September 22nd, 2014

library_reads_logo_websiteThe National Book Foundation has announced the 2014 nominees for the National Book Award. Four of the nominated fiction titles have been on LibraryReads lists: Some Luck by Jane Smiley, Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, and Orfeo by Richard Powers.

Follow this link to see all four nominee lists (fiction, nonfiction, poetry & young people’s literature).

fictionlist

 

Rabih Alameddine, An Unnecessary Woman

Molly Antopol, The UnAmericans

John Darnielle, Wolf in White Van

Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See

Phil Klay, Redeployment

Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven

Elizabeth McCracken, Thunderstruck & Other Stories

Richard Powers, Orfeo

Marilynne Robinson, Lila

Jane Smiley, Some Luck

 


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